School Segregation 2010

protest School Segregation 2010

Although racial segregation in schools was outlawed more than 55 years ago in the case of Brown v. Board of Education, a rural county in southwestern Mississippi has still continued grouping African American students in all-black classrooms, while allowing their white peers to transfer to a majority-white school.

A recent court order from the U.S. Justice Department’s civil rights division indicates that Walthall County must immediately desegregate its schools.

According to the Washington Post, the local school board has been permitting hundreds of white students to transfer away from their county’s Tylertown schools, where 75 percent of the students are African American. The white students usually transfer to the Salem Attendance Center, where 66 percent of the “wildcats” are white.

Segregation is also occurring within Tylertown’s campuses. Black students are reportedly grouped together in the same classes, while white students placed in others.

Senior Judge Tom S. Lee of the U.S District Court of Southern Mississippi says that

“District administrators group or cluster disproportionate numbers of white students into designated classrooms, resulting in significant numbers of segregated, all black classrooms at each grade level.

Examiner.com
When I was in school, there was no bussing, at least; not in the schools I attended. By the time my younger sister got to high school, they were bussing in students (almost all black) from the Bronx; a nearly two hour trip for them. Even with that, the school was never more than half full. They kept building these huge high schools (7500-15,000 student capacity) in areas where there was not nearly enough of a population to sustain the schools. Meanwhile, other areas, desperately in need of new and larger schools got nothing. Affluent areas get whatever they want/demand, because they pay their taxes and they vote.

 School Segregation 2010

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